• 12 January 2022
    In January 2021, over 8,000 migrants left San Pedro Sula for the United States, fleeing the insecurity, poverty, and uncertainty of Honduras, a situation that had worsened due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the grave impacts of Hurricanes Eta and Iota. Participating in this caravan were approximately 300 members of the LGBTQI+ community, of whom 100 were trans woman.
  • 30 November 2021
    As we await the final results of the Honduran elections, one thing is clear. This moment represents not only the culmination of an electoral process, but also the convergence of the multiple crises the country has faced since the 2009 Coup d’État, and particularly over the four years since the contested elections of 2017.
  • 23 November 2021
    When the protests first began in Guapinol, Juana Ramona Zúñiga was in a meeting with the community council. She received a call; they wanted her to join a demonstration in the street. “The struggle is contagious.
  • 28 September 2021
     
  • 28 July 2021
    “Honduras will not be ZEDE-d,” has been the main response of Honduran society in the face of the imminent implementation of Employment and Economic Development Zones (ZEDEs, as per the abbreviation in Spanish) in different areas throughout the country. These zones are defined by the Honduran Secretary for Economic Development as areas of Honduran national territory, which are subject to a “special regime”, and in which investors control fiscal policy, security, and conflict resolution.
  • 30 June 2021
    When she discovered that a hydroelectric project was threatening her community’s river, Alba Domínguez, a member of the San José Civil Society, changed her sewing machines for meetings, picket lines, and other acts of protest. “I could only find time to sew at night. Little by little, I lost clients because I did not have the time. In the end, I had to leave my job”.
  • 17 May 2021
    “It’s not just that they kill us. They don’t even investigate who did it”. This is how LSettingsGBTQI+ community organisations in Honduras describe the situation in the country, where over 90% of hate crimes go unpunished.
  • 4 May 2021
    2020 was a year defined not only by the questionable handling of the COVID-19 health emergency, but also by the impacts of hurricanes Eta and Iota. According to Centro de Estudios para la Democracia (CESPAD), these events, “have worsened food insecurity due to the lack of employment in the country, the depletion of food reserves, the increase in food prices, land and envi
  • 6 April 2021
    Last November, Honduras underwent its third Universal Periodic Review (UPR). One of the country’s most-lauded advances was the creation of the National Protection Mechanism (the Mechanism), based on the National Protection Law, which was drafted as a result of the recommendations made during the previous UPR cycle in 2015.
  • 8 February 2021
    “In the villages of Colón, we do not want to be part of the migrant caravans”. The Coordination of Popular Organisations of the Bajo Aguán (COPA) explains that several members of the Guapinol community have already been expelled from their homes as a result of the conflict with mining company Pinares Investments. Some of them left under death threats; others left over their fears for the future.

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